From Bling to Buddhism: Why You Should Visit Myanmar Now

From Bling to Buddhism: Why You Should Visit Myanmar Now

Just before President Obama takes off on his first overseas trip since his re-election to the Southeast Asian country of Myanmar, our very own Holly Monahan scopes out the scene.
 
Myanmar is fast becoming Southeast Asia’s most sought-after destination. After 50 years under a restrictive military regime, recent pro-democracy reforms have positioned the country, known formerly as Burma, at the cusp of a significant time for change and development.
 
On my recent tour of Myanmar, I was astounded by the fantastic cultural touring, picturesque villages, gorgeous natural settings, and warm, hospitable people, eager to share their stories and show off their country to the outside world. Scheduling note: Myanmar’s high season now stretches from October – March. We recommend booking a year in advance for travel during these months in order to secure the most deluxe hotels and Irrawaddy River cruises.
 
Shwedagon
Myanmar’s Glittering Shwedagon Pagoda
 
It may seem the terms “bling” and “Buddhism” are opposing forces, but at Yangon’s iconic Shwedagon Pagoda, the two come together magnificently. Myanmar’s holiest Buddhist shrine, said to house eight hairs of the Buddha, rises to 321 feet, every inch covered in pure gold. But that’s not all—the top is crowned with thousands of diamonds and rubies, capped with a staggering 76-carat diamond bud.
 
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A local monk during a quiet moment at one of the smaller shrines
 
While Shwedagon is spectacular, the scores of smaller shrines and pagodas surrounding it on all sides, showcase a range of unique devotional styles. Here, a monk stops for a quiet moment in front of an array of Buddha images, all taking the pose called “calling the earth to witness.” Before visiting, you may want to determine weekday of your birth. The zodiac here, which is taken quite seriously by Buddhists in Myanmar, is based on the day one was born. Wednesday morning and afternoon are considered two different days, so time of birth is important for those born on that day. Here, and at other temples, you will find a special pagoda platform corresponding to your day of the week.
 
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The timeworn buildings of Yangon Street
 
The cityscape of Yangon is notable for its wide boulevards, plots of trees, and its heritage architecture, built in the day when it was colonial Rangoon. These lovely buildings, some crumbling, some lovingly restored, lend a vintage look to the city.
 
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Yangon’s Bogyoke Aung San Market
 
A female monks passes through the colorful prints of the fabric stalls at Yangon’s Bogyoke Aung San Market. Originally christened Scott’s Market in 1926, it was renamed after independence for the assassinated General Aung San, whose daughter is the celebrated Burmese activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Aung Sun Suu Kyi. The market is popular with both locals and visitors as a place to change money, and shop for fine and costume jewelry, antiques, clothing, handicrafts, and much more.
 
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Ananda Temple, one of the largest, best-preserved and most exquisite temples in Bagan
 
The highlight of any tour through Myanmar is breathtaking Bagan, where over 2,000 magnificent temples and pagodas rise from the plains to create a fantastical landscape. It’s hard to imagine that these are just a fraction of the 10,000 structures that stood here before the fall of the kingdom in 1287. It would take many months to visit all the temples and pagodas, so our tours focus on some of the most significant. One of these gems is the architectural masterpiece, the Ananda Temple, one of the largest, best-preserved and most exquisite in Bagan.
 
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The colorful morning market at Nyaung U
 
The morning market at Nyaung U just outside of Bagan is a riot of color from the variety of fresh produce for sale to the clothing worn by those selling and shopping. Villagers from around the region converge at this authentic market where business is conducted as it has been for centuries. Merchants often sit on the ground surrounded by their wares, which they weigh using an old-fashioned hand-held balance scale.
 
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A local child sports the traditional application of thanaka
 
The market is a good place to admire women and children (and the occasional man) with their faces adorned by a traditional application of thanaka. This paste is made fresh from ground wood and applied daily as a cosmetic, sunscreen, and skin treatment. It is said that the Burmese people have been wearing this distinctive look for millennia.
 
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The sun sets over Bagan
 
One of the best parts of a private tour is traveling with a well-connected guide. My guide in Bagan secured special access to an otherwise-empty temple rooftop. There, away from the crowds jockeying for position on the “official” sunset temple, we basked in an almost magical serenity and calm as the sun set over Bagan’s plains of temples.
 
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Novice monks line up for their mid-day alms
 
The Mahagandhayon Monastery, near Mandalay, is the largest Buddhist monastery in Myanmar. With over 1,000 monks in residence, it makes for a superb place to witness the monks lining up for their mid-day alms. Boys sometimes spend their summers as novice monks, learning the tenants of Buddhism, in a very Burmese take on summer camp. Here, the novices in white line up with ordained monks to receive their midday alms. Like kids anywhere, some find it impossible not to talk to their neighbors while waiting in line.
 
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Quiet entrance to the lovely Inle Princess Resort
 
My tour of Myanmar ended in the charming Inle Lake, a beautiful region where gardens floats, houses stand on stilts, and the main form of transportation is the moto-gondola. Here, the engines are turned off for a quiet entrance to the lovely Inle Princess Resort.
 
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Cat Crazy!
 
The Inthar Heritage House aka Inle Lake’s “Cat Café” is a lovely traditional stilt building surrounded by gardens growing flowers and organic vegetables. A small art gallery on site promotes the work of local artists. But the true highlight here (at least for feline fanatics) is a visit with the resident Burmese cats, once nearly extinct in their indigenous homeland. Today, a small population of these friendly and sweet-natured cats enthusiastically welcomes visitors to their home on the lake.
 
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My most memorable meal: A bowl of steaming fresh noodles slathered with a thick soybean cream and topped off with chilis and spices
 
Burmese cuisine is unique, with influences from neighboring Thailand, China, and India. Dishes like the pungent, fermented tea leaf salad are popular, as is local seafood with green chili curry. In Yangon, an assortment of international restaurants tempts with delicious offerings. For me, the most memorable meal was at this simple shack at Inle Lake, where women from the Shan ethnic group serve their popular breakfast dish called Tohu Nuway. It’s a bowl of steaming fresh noodles slathered with a thick soybean cream and topped off with chilis and spices. Divine!
 
Contact luxury travel expert, Holly Monahan, if you would like to learn more about her experience in Myanmar or would like to plan a trip of your own!

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